• Working together, and doing things differently we can create inclusive events and activities that celebrate diversity. Let’s make Adelaide the most accessible city in Australia!

  • Universal design will broaden business appeal. Design and cater for all people. Grow your business.

  • You may need to make exceptions to practices, policies or procedures to accommodate disabled people. Change practices to improve access.

  • Nearly 30% of people with disability indicated that they weren’t getting out of their home as often as they would like to (ABS 2012). Play a vital role in maximizing opportunities for Deaf and disabled people.

  • The National Disability Insurance Scheme (the NDIS) is an insurance model replacing Australia’s old welfare and charity model of disability funding. Get ready to be inclusive.

  • The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Article 30 – states that people with disability have the same right to take part in cultural life as other people do. See human rights as a priority.

  • Many booking systems don’t allow Deaf and disabled customers to purchase tickets and communicate their access requirements. Check that booking systems are inclusive.

  • 1 in 5 South Australians have disability. Disabled people are never just disabled people – they cross all ages, race and genders. Identify this segment in your current target market.

  • Language used by disabled people focuses on respect and self-representation. Treat everyone with the same respect.

  • Do your web pages work for everybody? Accessible web content includes alternatives for multimedia and functionality from a keyboard. Set up a user group for feedback.

  • Getting to and from a venue is important Provide details of public transport and create drop off points where cars and taxis can set down passengers close to a venue. Communicate transport options.

  • People with sensory impairments may require alternative communication formats. Check the accessibility of communications.

  • Universal Access Symbols are internationally recognised and represent important information about access. Use universal access symbols to promote and publicise accessibility.

  • Businesses with improved access appeal to a broader range of visitors. Everyone, including families and overseas visitors, appreciates inclusive design and services. Improve access and improve your business.

  • You don’t have to fix everything all at once. Often smaller changes have the biggest impact. Start with the basics.

  • Good access takes into account how all Deaf and disabled people access goods, services and facilities as well as buildings. Think beyond ramps.

  • Disability Equality Training can result in making your business more accessible and inclusive for everybody. Provide a consistent level of service.

  • An Access Statement is a marketing tool that provides clear and honest information on the accessibility of your venue’s facilities and services. Create an Access Statement.

  • Guide and assistance dogs are highly trained animals that act as aids to disabled people, enabling them to function independently. Welcome assistance animals onto your premises.

  • People with disability report lower levels of attendance at arts events than people without disability. (Australia Council for the Arts 2013). Play a vital role in maximizing opportunities for Deaf and disabled people.

  • Improvements don’t always require major refurbishment or expense. 
When access is factored form the beginning it can save money. Include universal design in initial planning.

  • Signage is an integral communication system that gives clear directions, information and instructions to patrons. Make your signage accessible for everybody.

  • The Companion Card is issued to people that are unable to access activities and venues without attendant support. A companion is allowed to enter free of charge. Become a Companion Card Affiliate.

  • People with disability are 15% less likely to participate in sport and active recreation than the general population. (Getting Involved in Sport 2010). Play a vital role in maximizing opportunities for Deaf and disabled people.

  • If you run an event, you are responsible for making sure the event is accessible. This includes venues, sound systems and catering services. Make access a core business objective.

  • Direct discrimination occurs when a person with disability is treated less favorably. Indirect discrimination occurs when the needs of people with disability are not considered. Take action to stop discrimination.

  • Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA) protects against discrimination based on disability. The Act defines disability discrimination as unlawful and promotes equal rights. Provide universal access to achieve equality.

  • Barriers created by society are ‘disabling’ to an individual. It is our collective responsibility to remove barriers. Be part of the difference.

  • Make a clear distinction between disability and impairment. Impairment is the condition, illness or loss/lack of function. Disability is barriers. Change your understanding.

  • Disability is the loss or limitation of opportunities to take part in the community on an equal basis as the result of barriers. Identify and disable barriers.